Due to precautions related to COVID-19, we have expanded our options for remote consultations. Please contact our office to discuss whether a full phone consultation or video conference is appropriate for your situation.
Brand Logo

813-217-5613
Call Us Today

Attorney

The long-term impact of pedestrian accidents

Pedestrian accidents result in many different challenges for victims, including high levels of pain, emotional distress, legal hurdles, permanent disability and long-term financial problems. Filing suit helps many pedestrian accident victims receive compensation and restore some sense of normalcy. Sadly, some are permanently injured in these accidents and the impact of the incident haunts them for the rest of their lives.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 5,900 pedestrians died in accidents during 2017, and many sustained serious injuries. In the wake of a pedestrian accident, many victims need to focus on the immediate challenges they are facing. However, you also need to think about the difficulties you will encounter later on, especially if you want to take a stand for your rights and are preparing for legal action.

Reviewing permanent mental and physical challenges brought on by pedestrian accidents

Pedestrian accidents can lead to a number of different mental and physical hardships. In addition to depression and anxiety, some victims have a very hard time with the consequences of a brain injury. Many struggle with memory problems and some even experience changes to their personality. Moreover, some people lose the ability to walk for the rest of their lives because of a pedestrian accident. There are other ways in which pedestrians are immobilized and this can create many hardships in life.

Reviewing other long-term consequences associated with a pedestrian accident

If your job requires you to perform certain physical or mental tasks that have become impossible and you do not ever expect to make a full recovery, it is very likely that you need to switch careers or stop working altogether. Moreover, those struggling with brain damage or a lifelong disability often become depressed when they have to give up on their dreams and hobbies they enjoy. These hardships also place strain on one’s family members in many instances and it is pivotal to plan ahead.